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Coenzyme Q10 - CellSparc Q
Coenzyme Q10 - CellSparc Q

Coenzyme Q10 Provides More Energy
and the Nutrition Your Body Deserves
 
  
  
        

Coenzyme Q10 and human nutrition

Coenzyme Q10 is found in the foods we eat, but not often in large amounts. The best sources of coenzyme Q10 are animal organs, some types of fish, and vegetable oils such as soybean, rapeseed, and sesame. It is found in lesser quantities in rice bran and wheat germ, and in soy and other beans. It is also found in vegetables, in particular spinach and broccoli. Coenzyme Q10 is easily destroyed in the cooking process, and in refined grains much of the coenzyme Q10 is removed.

However, the body does not necessarily need a direct source of coenzyme Q10 to maintain adequate levels. The body can also manufacture coenzyme Q10 from other members of the coenzyme Q family. Coenzyme Q10 is but one of ten, and possibly more, members of the coenzyme Q family.

The most basic form of coenzyme Q is a circle of chemical elements that form a single coenzyme Q molecule. This coenzyme Q molecule can have side chains that contain five carbon atoms. It is the number of side chains that is the basis for the number assigned to each member of the coenzyme Q family. For example, coenzyme Q1 has one side chain of five carbon atoms. Coenzyme Q2 has two side chains of five carbon atoms each, for a total of ten carbon atoms. In coenzyme Q10, there are ten side chains and a total of 50 carbon atoms. Human tissue contains only coenzyme Q10.

To change other coenzyme Qs into coenzyme Q10, the liver breaks down the side chains. It then reassembles them to form coenzyme Q10. For example, a meal consisting of shellfish, vegetables, and mushrooms provides coenzyme Q9 and coenzyme Q7. The liver breaks these coenzymes down and manufactures coenzyme Q10 from their components.

The creation of coenzyme Q10 by the body is a complex process. To make this change, at least three different classes of starting molecules are required, at least 15 different reactions are necessary (each begun by an enzyme), and there are many cofactor substances. This means that coenzyme Q10 is difficult for the body to produce because all the component parts must be available in sufficient quantities at the same time.  Some of the essential cofactors are not created by the body. A deficiency in any of these-vitamins B3, B5, B6, B12, C, and folate-would make it difficult for the liver to produce enough coenzyme Q10. Unfortunately, the older you get, the less ability you have to produce coenzyme Q10 from other members of the coenzyme Q family.

Our lives and environment also affect coenzyme Q10 levels; stressful lives and polluted environments can deplete coenzyme Q10 from body tissue.  

According to Dr. Folkers, these factors-nutrient deficiencies, age, stress, and pollution-could lead to a deficiency of coenzyme Q10. By some estimates, as many as 75 percent of people over age 50 in the United States could be deficient in coenzyme Q10.

 CellSparc 360

Coenzyme Q10 Information
Coenzyme Q10 and Energy
Coenzyme Q10 - Its History

        
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